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Island with 14 turn-of-the-20th-century summer cottages, representative of the era's rise in white-collar jobs, inter-urban rail transit for commuting, and the adoption of seasonal residences among Minnesota's middle class.

Only surviving example of the Twin Cities' once-common Carpenter Gothic cottages, built by master carpenter B. Cutter for himself in 1856 and later owned by early Minneapolis leading citizen John Gilfillan (1835–1924).

Also noted as a major work of Minneapolis architect Ralph Rapson. Long-serving commodity marketplace that helped make Minneapolis a major international grain trade center, with three buildings constructed 1902–28.

Also noted architecturally for the city's first steel building and one of its few Sullivanesque designs.

Within the next ten years, he established a sawmill at the falls, and lumbermen from the north began cutting trees and sending them to Steele's sawmill.

In 1849, Steele subdivided his property and filed a plat for the town of Saint Anthony.

The two towns prospered as a result of industries and businesses based around the falls, but business was better on the west side of the falls.

Minneapolis incorporated as a city in 1867, and three years later it merged with the village of Saint Anthony.

A significant number of these properties are a result of the establishment of Fort Snelling, the development of water power at Saint Anthony Falls, and the thriving city of Minneapolis that developed around the falls.

Renamed the Minneapolis Grain Exchange in 1947.2.8-mile (4.5 km) trench and 28 bridges built 1912–1916 to separate rail and street traffic, an urban planning accomplishment to improve both safety and industry. Minneapolis' oldest surviving railway station, built 1897–9, with an earlier 1879 freight house.

Also significant for their architecture, association with the milling district, and preservation of one of the nation’s few remaining truss-roofed train sheds.

While the falls were familiar to the Ojibwe and Sioux Indians who lived in the area, Father Hennepin spread word of the falls when he returned to France in 1683.

The land east of the Mississippi came under England's control in 1763, and then became American territory after the American Revolutionary War in 1783.

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